Saturday, March 04, 2006

Transamerica

I just got back from seeing Transamerica with friends tonight. This is the third movie I've seen this week, which is more movies than I normally watch in a year's time!

I can't remember the last time I saw a movie and the audience burst into applause at the end of the film (and this was a mostly older, straight audience too from the looks of it).

The movie was serious, sweet, sad and funny (so funny at times that we would miss the next line because we were laughing so hard). Although I kinda think the road-trip theme is a bit overdone in movies, it explored issues of family dramas, otherness, personal transformation--all stuff I can relate to. Felicity Huffman was fabulous. My friends often tease me about living under a rock (I can't remember the last time I turned on the TV, and I don't have cable), so I didn't even know of Felicity Huffman from "Desperate Housewives" and when watching the film, I didn't realize she was a genetic woman.

I really enjoyed seeing a movie about "people like me" that wasn't all sad, wasn't all about sex, and showed the real struggles and triumphs of someone who doesn't fit into society's narrow boxes.

4 comments:

  1. I thought the same thing about the road trip and there were a few other minor things that I pick up on, like not stopping her medications a month before her surgery.
    In general I liked the movie and I think that it is great that it is appealing to a larger audiences. The movie shows that we are human, that we are struggling with our own problems in life. Before the movie, while I was standing out in the lobby waiting for the audience to get out from the previous showing, all of the conversations that I overheard as they were leaving were very positive and encouraging.
    Felicity Huffman comments when she won the Golden Globe Award really struck a positive cord; "I know as actors our job is usually to shed our skins. But I think as people our job is to become who we really are and so I would like to salute the men and women who brave ostracism, alienation and a life lived on the margins to become who they really are."

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  2. The acting was superb all around. Kevin Zegers range astounded me as much as Huffman's deep portrayal.

    Oh and Callicoon, KY is really filmed in Callicoon, NY two miles from where I grew up. It was so wierd suddenly seeing a place so familar in the middle of a film.

    So glad you got to see this film. I hope everyone does.
    Peterson

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  3. Wow, Diana. That quote from Huffman is amazing, I agree. I have to tell you I was thrilled to see a comment from you on my blog - I've really enjoyed (and learned from) your contributions over at Peterson's blog. So thanks for adding your voice here.

    One of the things I loved about the movie was just how humanizing it was, for everyone...even the parents (who I wanted to just completely hate at first, but then later could have some sympathy for their total confusion about their world and their child--even while hating their responses to her; and then later I appreciated for something they did during a family drama moment of the film--don't want to have spoilers in this thread). I have no idea if that made sense - whatever! ;)

    But I get what you are saying - the portrayal might not be perfect (the hormones thing), the story might not be similar exactly to anyone you know, but it's just so nice to see something onscreen you can relate to. At least that's the way I feel about seeing good representations of glbt folks onscreen.

    Anyway, thanks for your thoughts...I'm always interested in hearing more.

    Peterson, yeah I agree that all the acting was fantastic. And I know what you mean about seeing a place you know in the movies. I was born in a small town in Northern California that has been featured in a couple of movies, and it is kinda weird - but cool too.

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  4. “.......but then later could have some sympathy for their total confusion about their world and their child--even while hating their responses to her; and then later I appreciated for something they did during a family drama moment of the film”

    I know families that are like that from the support group I go to, the parents just don’t understand, but will support their child no matter what. But unfortunately, I also know some parents who have never spoken to their child again.

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